Lawmakers in Olympia reached out Wednesday with a simple message to immigrants:  “We’ve got your back.” Dan Frizzell has more.

The Muslim ban may be shot down, at least temporarily, but House and Senate Democrats at the state Capitol are preparing for more.  On a day when the Legislature took pause to recall and condemn the World War II internment of Japanese Americans, representatives and senators met with reporters to renew their pledge to resist any federal attempts to violate the civil rights of Washington residents. Current House bills would prohibit state agencies from helping the Trump administration compile religious registries, and would establish a hot-line for reporting a growing number of aggressive incidents verging on hate crime. Representative Lillian Ortiz-Self sponsored that bill, and the Mukilteo Democrat was adamant.

“We’ve seen a country that has been motivated by fear to create hatred and discrimination and injustice. And that is not OK.  This is our state.  It’s just not going to happen in this Washington.”

Even without a single Republican cosponsor, both bills are expected to pass the House, where Democrats hold the majority.  The picture is less promising in the Senate.  Republicans have a one-vote edge in that chamber, including a GOP senator who spends much of his time in Washington, D.C., working for Trump.  Democratic senators, however, did go out of their way Wednesday to commend Senator Joe Fain of Auburn, the lone Republican who agreed to cosponsor the anti-registry bill. In Olympia, I’m Dan Frizzell.